RETURN TO CONTENTS PAGE THE BOOKSHELF
Some of the books that we have drawn on for our discussion are brought together here for convenience. We have tried to give you a flavour of what they are about in our short descriptions
 

To Begin With. . . .

  1. Bem, S.L., (1993) The Lenses of Gender,
    London: Yale University Press ISBN 0300061633
    A pioneer in the study of gender and social stereotypes, and a leading feminist thinker, Professor Bem explores in a very readable way, her assertion that Western gender ideology is founded on, and constrained by androcentrism, gender polarisation and biological essentialism.
  2. Fausto Sterling, A., (1992) Myths of Gender, Biological Theories about Women and Men,
    New York: Basic Books ISBN 0465047920
    A readable attack by a feminist psychologist on biologically deterministic studies and the political influences that support them. In particular, she highlights the lack of null reporting. That is to say, although we are forever reading of studies that show some difference between the sexes, we have little knowledge of those that found no difference.
  3. Gross, R.D., (1987) Psychology: The Science of Mind and Behaviour,
    London: Hodder and Stoughton. ISBN 0713136235
    A comprehensive foundation reader in psychology, it is the GCE 'A' level set book.
  4. Rose.S, Lewontin, R.C, Kamin, L.J, (1990) Not In Our Genes: Biology, Idealogy and Human Nature.
    Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. ISBN 0140135251
    This book was recommended to me by my tutor, shortly after 'Brain Sex' (which you will note is not listed here) was published. It is written by three distinguished scientists, an evolutionary geneticist, a neurobiologist and a psychologist. Of particular relevance to this site, of course, is the chapter entitled "The Determined Patriarchy."
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1. Psychoanalysis

  1. Axline, V., (1964) Dibs: In Search of Self,
    London: Penguin Books. ISBN 014013459X
    Just how does the process of psychotherapy work with a small child? This is both a text book description and a very moving account. Very readable. "He would not talk. He would not play. Judged mentally defective, he was oblivious both to other children and to his teacher; in reality, he was a brilliant, lonely child trapped in a prison of fear and rage, a prison from which only he could release himself. And, through psychotherapy and love, he did."
  2. DeMause, L., (1976) History of Childhood: Evolution of Parent-Child Relationships,
    London: Souvenir Press ISBN 0947792686
    An extremely detailed scholarly, but readable, study of the experience of childhood from ancient times, by ten different authors, by 1991 it had the subtitle, The Untold Story of Child Abuse.
  3. Fordham. F, (1966) An Introduction to Jung's Psychology,
    London: Penguin Books. ISBN 0140135685
    An extremely readable precis of Jung's theories, it has a foreword by Jung, and was written with his active assistance.
  4. Money, J., Lamacz, M., (1989) Vandalised Lovemaps, Paraphilic Outcome of Seven Cases in Paediatric Sexology,
    New York: Prometheus Books. ISBN 087975513X
    Required reading for psychiatrists, built around seven case studies of people with congenital developmental problems, compounded, not only by family attitudes, but by insensitive professional treatment, referred to by the author as nosocomial abuse.
  5. Reiss, I.L., (1990) An End to Shame: Shaping our next sexual revolution,
    New York: Prometheus Books. ISBN 0879756357
    An extremely readable attack on our negative attitudes to sex which cause actual harm.
  6. Stevens, R., (1983) Freud and Psychoanalysis: An Exposition and Appraisal,
    Milton Keynes: Open University Press. ISBN 0335101801
    A readable introduction to Freud's theories about the unconscious, psychosexual development and psychodynamics. It also discusses the criticisms made by more 'scientific' psychologists and ends with an introduction to psychoanalytic practice.
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2. Psychology

  1. Bowlby J, (1953) Child Care and the Growth of Love,
    Harmondsworth: Penguin. ISBN 0140134581
    The exposition of Bowlby's theories, it is included here since it is quoted in nearly all text books about child development and, in particular, maternal attachment.
  2. Donaldson, M., (1978) Children's Minds,
    Glasgow: Harper Collins. ISBN 0006861229
    This book is about the way children think and learn, particularly with reference to our education system. There is an appendix which discusses the main features of Piaget's theories.
  3. Eysenck.M.W., Keane.M.T., (1990) Cognitive Psychology: A Student's Handbook,
    Hove: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. ISBN0863771548
    A third-year degree level textbook, it is nevertheless well laid out and extremely readable.
  4. Harris, J.R., (1999) The Nurture Assumption: Why Children Turn Out They Way They Do,
    New York: Touchstone (Simon and Schuster) ISBN 0684857073
    In challenging the academic establishment, Harris caused an uproar, but gained the support of Stephen Pinker. Though she may be accused of understating the role parents play in shaping a child, this is a long overdue review of the primary role of the peer group, particularly in imposing cultural stereotypes. A five star book.
  5. Rogers, C., (1967) On Becoming a Person,
    London: Constable (1974 edition). ISBN 0094604401
    Carl Rogers' name is inextricably linked with the beginnings of humanistic, or person-centred psychotherapy, sometimes called 'counselling.' This an exposition of his theories and practice.
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3. Genetics

  1. Carr, M., Cordell, B., (1992) Biochemistry,
    Walton on Thames: Nelson. ISBN 0174481969
    One of a series of introductory textbooks for Advanced Level Biology.
  2. Cohen, J., Stewart, I., (2000) The Collapse of Chaos: Discovering Simplicity in a Complex World
    London: Penguin Books. ISBN 0140291253
    There have been a number of books about chaos, complex systems and emergent properties. This is a collaboration between a biologist and a mathematician which clarifies their meaning for real life science. In other words, what science knows, in terms of reductionist theories and what it doesn't, and possibly cannot. Can one really find such simplicities in a complex universe?
  3. Gould, S.J., (1977) Ontogeny and Phylogeny,
    Cambridge: Belknap Press. ISBN 0674639413
    Hailed as a classic. The history, from the eighteenth century, of the controversy between ontogeny and phylogeny, preformatism and epigenesis. For the more academic reader.
  4. Jenkins, M., (1998) Genetics
    London: Hodder and Stoughton. ISBN 0340705078
    An extremely readable introduction to genetics for the lay person, and an entertaining supplement for students wading through the heavier textbooks.
  5. Jones, S., (1996) In The Blood: God, Genes and Destiny,
    London: Harper Collins. ISBN 0002555115
    A very readable discussion of genes, inheritance and inheritance patterns, through history and across the world, by a leading professor of genetics. One should, however, should take the inset sections with a pinch of salt. One might speculate that they were included by the publisher without giving the author the opportunity to consider them properly.
  6. LeVay, S., (1994) The Sexual Brain,
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ISBN 0262620936
    A readable account of predetermining biological factors in sexual orientation. It is not totally unbiased, but it is at least by someone who knows what he is writing about.
  7. Little, P., (2002) Genetic Destinies
    Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0198607849
    Popular works on genes and environment are either generalised to the point of vagueness, or they become so immersed in detail that one loses sight of the question. From the start, the author refers, not to genes, but gene differences between individuals. He includes just enough detail to make his points, but strips away the jargon, and tackles such sensitive issues as genetic determinism, eugenics, genetic engineering and embryonic stem cell techology head on. This is an ideal book for the lay reader worried about the impact of gene science on our lives.
  8. Rose, S., Mileusnic, R.,(1999) The Chemistry of Life.
    London: Penguin Books. ISBN 0140272739
    This is the newer edition of the book, produced in collaboration with Radmilla Mileusnic. While originally intended as an exposition of biochemistry for the popular market, the first edition soon became required reading in schools and colleges. It thus has that rare combination of readability and authority that one might expect from Professor Rose.
  9. Roughgarden, J., (2004) Evolution's Rainbow: Diversity, Gender and Sexuality in Nature and People
    University of California Press. ISBN 0520240731
    The book begins by looking at the diversity of animal sexual and mating behaviours from a system viewpoint, and follows by discussing the literature about human development, finishing with a review of the diversity of sexual and gender systems across human cultures. What emerges is a critique of the stereotypes that are endemic in ethology and evolutionary psychology, from Darwin through to Dawkin's Selfish Gene. Roughgarden confronts head on the puzzle of human homosexuality with the premise that, if a theory says that there is something wrong with so many people, it is the theory that is wrong, not the people.
  10. Tudge, C., (2000) In Mendel's Footnotes
    London: Jonathan Cape ISBN 0224059777
    This is a biography of Mendel, the scientific world of which he was a part, the cultural changes which were occurring, and the uneasy relationship between science and religion. It then describes the "New Synthesis" of inheritance, Darwinian evolution and genetics and discusses his impact on the world today.
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4. The Developing Embryo

  1. Bancroft J. (1989) Human Sexuality and its Problems,
    Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone ISBN 0443034559
    An encyclopedic professional text book on sex, development, social issues, sexual problems and relationships.
  2. Bleier, R., (1984) Science and Gender: A critique of biology and its theories on women,
    New York: Pergamon Press ISBN 0 8077 6200 8
    ...........
  3. Cookson, W., (1994) The Gene Hunters: Adventures in the Genome Jungle
    London: Aurum Press ISBN 1854102567
    Though now out of print, it is worth reading if possible. From Mendel to the beginning of the Human Genome Project, it is a fascinating historical account of genetic discoveries, of the personalities of those who made them and their rivalries. While some theory is unavoidable it is not heavy going for the lay reader.
  4. Dreger, A.D., (1998) Hermaphrodites and the Medical Invention of Sex,
    London: Harvard University Press, ISBN 0674089278
    An account of the interaction between the medical profession and the hermaphrodites who sought their help in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the way the former set out to enforce clear distinctions between males and females in theory and practice.
  5. Fausto Sterling, A., (1992) Myths of Gender, Biological Theories about Women and Men,
    New York: Basic Books ISBN 0465047920
    A readable attack by a feminist psychologist on biologically deterministic studies and the political influences that support them. In particular, she highlights the lack of null reporting. That is to say, although we are forever reading of studies that show some difference between the sexes, we have little knowledge of those that found no difference.
  6. Fausto Sterling, A., (1999) Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality,
    New York: Basic Books ISBN 0465077137
    A sequel to her earlier book, the author enlarges on many of her themes, but she also asserts that sex, let alone gender, is not as clear cut as it would seem.
  7. Jenkins, M., (1998) Genetics
    London: Hodder and Stoughton. ISBN 0340705078
    An extremely readable introduction to genetics for the lay person, and an entertaining supplement for students wading through the heavier textbooks.
  8. Money. T., Ehrhardt, A., (1972) Man and Woman, Boy and Girl, The differentiation and dimorphism of gender identity from conception to maturity,
    Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. (Now in reprint by Aronson) ISBN 0801814065
    The seminal work on gender identity development, a handbook for psychiatrists, but still very readable. It is illuminating that, in 1960, the author was accused by feminists of being a biological determinist, and in 1989 of being a mentalist. It seems you can't please everyone all of the time!
  9. Rose.S, Lewontin, R.C, Kamin, L.J, (1990) Not In Our Genes: Biology, Idealogy and Human Nature.
    Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. ISBN 0140135251
    This book was recommended to me by my tutor, shortly after 'Brain Sex' (which you will note is not listed here) was published. It is written by three distinguished scientists, an evolutionary geneticist, a neurobiologist and a psychologist. Of particular relevance to this site, of course, is the chapter entitled "The Determined Patriarchy."
  10. Tudge, C., (2000) In Mendel's Footnotes
    London: Jonathan Cape ISBN 0224059777
    This is a biography of Mendel, the scientific world of which he was a part, the cultural changes which were occurring, and the uneasy relationship between science and religion. It then describes the "New Synthesis" of inheritance, Darwinian evolution and genetics and discusses his impact on the world today.
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5. Development.

  1. Archer, J., Lloyd, B., (1985) Sex and Gender,
    Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. ISBN 0521319218
    John Archer and Barbara Lloyd have been prolific writers on the subject of sex and gender and probably provide the most balanced account there is. Supplementary reading for the 'A' level student.
  2. Bancroft J. (1989) Human Sexuality and its Problems,
    Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone ISBN 0443034559
    An encyclopedic professional text book on sex, development, social issues, sexual problems and relationships.
  3. Bem, S.L., (1993) The Lenses of Gender,
    London: Yale University Press ISBN 0300061633
    A pioneer in the study of gender and social stereotypes, and a leading feminist thinker, Professor Bem explores in a very readable way, her assertion that Western gender ideology is founded on, and constrained by androcentrism, gender polarisation and biological essentialism.
  4. Cookson, W., (1994) The Gene Hunters: Adventures in the Genome Jungle
    London: Aurum Press ISBN 1854102567
    Though now out of print, it is worth reading if possible. From Mendel to the beginning of the Human Genome Project, it is a fascinating historical account of genetic discoveries, of the personalities of those who made them and their rivalries. While some theory is unavoidable it is not heavy going for the lay reader.
  5. Herdt. G., (ed) (1994) Third Sex, Third Gender: Beyond Sexual Dimorphism in Culture and History,
    New York: Zone Books ISBN 0942299817
    A large scholarly, but readable, book by ten different authors, discussing the construction of gender in widely differing cultures. It makes a refreshing change from similar gay histories which concentrate on the act of sex, and discard the complex cultural issues involved.
  6. Money. T., Ehrhardt, A., (1972) Man and Woman, Boy and Girl, The differentiation and dimorphism of gender identity from conception to maturity,
    Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. (Now in reprint by Aronson) ISBN 0801814065
    The seminal work on gender identity development, a handbook for psychiatrists, but still very readable. It is illuminating that, in 1960, the author was accused by feminists of being a biological determinist, and in 1989 of being a mentalist. It seems you can't please everyone all of the time!
  7. Money, J., Lamacz, M., (1989) Vandalised Lovemaps, Paraphilic Outcome of Seven Cases in Paediatric Sexology,
    New York: Prometheus Books. ISBN 087975513X
    Required reading for psychiatrists, built around seven case studies of people with congenital developmental problems, compounded, not only by family attitudes, but by insensitive professional treatment, referred to by the author as nosocomial abuse.
  8. Reiss, I.L., (1990) An End to Shame: Shaping our next sexual revolution,
    New York: Prometheus Books. ISBN 0879756357
    An extremely readable attack on our negative attitudes to sex which cause actual harm.
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6. Hormones in Context.

  1. Bancroft J. (1989) Human Sexuality and its Problems,
    Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone ISBN 0443034559
    An encyclopedic professional text book on sex, development, social issues, sexual problems and relationships.
  2. Goodall, J., (1986) The Chimpanzees of Gombe,
    London: Harvard University Press. ISBN 0674116496
    The detailed field study notes from twenty five years in the Gombe National Park. One to order from the library, this is now, in any case, out of print.
    However, a good general reading book by Jane Goodall is Through a Window: Thirty Years Observing the Chimpanzees of Gombe.(ISBN 0753801744)
  3. Rose, S., Mileusnic, R.,(1999) The Chemistry of Life.
    London: Penguin Books. ISBN 0140272739
    This is the newer edition of the book, produced in collaboration with Radmilla Mileusnic. While originally intended as an exposition of biochemistry for the popular market, the first edition soon became required reading in schools and colleges. It thus has that rare combination of readability and authority that one might expect from Professor Rose.
  4. Rose, S., (1997) Lifelines: Biology, Freedom, Determinism.
    London: Allen Lane, The Penguin Press. ISBN 0713991577
    Professor Rose confronts head-on the reductionist claims of biologists (in the form of geneticists and Ultra-Darwinists), and in an extremely readable manner, explains how the organism is an active agent in its own destiny.
  5. Rose.S, Lewontin, R.C, Kamin, L.J, (1990) Not In Our Genes: Biology, Idealogy and Human Nature.
    Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. ISBN 0140135251
    This book was recommended to me by my tutor, shortly after 'Brain Sex' (which you will note is not listed here) was published. It is written by three distinguished scientists, an evolutionary geneticist, a neurobiologist and a psychologist. Of particular relevance to this site, of course, is the chapter entitled "The Determined Patriarchy."
  6. Symons, D., (1979) The Evolution of Human Sexuality,
    New York: Oxford University Press ISBN 0195025350
    A scholarly, but readable, sociobiological account. Very well respected. Its place on my bookshelf, however is next to Hrdy's "The Woman that Never Evolved."
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7.Neurobiology

  1. Bancroft J. (1989) Human Sexuality and its Problems,
    Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone ISBN 0443034559
    An encyclopedic professional text book on sex, development, social issues, sexual problems and relationships.
  2. Cookson, W., (1994) The Gene Hunters: Adventures in the Genome Jungle
    London: Aurum Press ISBN 1854102567
    Though now out of print, it is worth reading if possible. From Mendel to the beginning of the Human Genome Project, it is a fascinating historical account of genetic discoveries, of the personalities of those who made them and their rivalries. While some theory is unavoidable it is not heavy going for the lay reader.
  3. Fausto Sterling, A., (1992) Myths of Gender, Biological Theories about Women and Men,
    New York: Basic Books ISBN 0465047920
    A readable attack by a feminist psychologist on biologically deterministic studies and the political influences that support them. In particular, she highlights the lack of null reporting. That is to say, although we are forever reading of studies that show some difference between the sexes, we have little knowledge of those that found no difference.
  4. Fausto Sterling, A., (1999) Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality,
    New York: Basic Books ISBN 0465077137
    A sequel to her earlier book, the author enlarges on many of her themes, but she also asserts that sex, let alone gender, is not as clear cut as it would seem.
  5. Fodor, J., (1996),The Modularity of Mind,
    Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ISBN 0262560259
    Included here as an exposition of Fodor's hypotheses, I will make another attempt to read it some time, for he makes an arcane subject twice as difficult with his fetish for flowery English.
  6. LeVay, S., (1994) The Sexual Brain,
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ISBN 0262620936
    A readable account of predetermining biological factors in sexual orientation. It is not totally unbiased, but it is at least by someone who knows what he is writing about.
  7. Pinker, S., (1994) The Language Instinct: How the mind creates language,
    New York: William Morrow and Company ISBN 0688121411
    Because studies are easy to set up with clearly defined and unequivocal variables, we know more about the psychology of language and vision than anything else. This is a general reader, though it gets heavy, but not difficult, going in places about how inherited abilities are brought into action by socialisation.
  8. Rose. S, (1993) The Making of Memory: From molecules to mind,
    Ealing: Bantam Books. ISBN 0553407481
    An extremely readable survey by a neurobiologist of the existing state of our knowledge of the brain, in addition, Professor Rose does not shirk from the sensitive ethics of animal experimentation, while including some scandal about the politics of being part of a scientific community. What is clear is his enthusiasm for his work, and for sharing his insights.
  9. Rose.S, Lewontin, R.C, Kamin, L.J, (1990) Not In Our Genes: Biology, Idealogy and Human Nature.
    Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. ISBN 0140135251
    This book was recommended to me by my tutor, shortly after 'Brain Sex' (which you will note is not listed here) was published. It is written by three distinguished scientists, an evolutionary geneticist, a neurobiologist and a psychologist. Of particular relevance to this site, of course, is the chapter entitled "The Determined Patriarchy."
  10. Springer, S.P., Deutsch, G., (1993 4th. ed) Left Brain, Right Brain
    New York: W.H.Freeman and Company ISBN 0716723727
    A description of how mental functions are divided between the left and right sides of the brain, exploring asymmetry in normal, split-brain and brain-damaged cases, focusing on such key topics as left-handedness, sex differences, psychiatric illness, learning disabilities and theories of consciousness, discussing biological differences in the way men and women think.
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8. Evolution

  1. Roughgarden, J., (2004) Evolution's Rainbow: Diversity, Gender and Sexuality in Nature and People
    University of California Press. ISBN 0520240731
    The book begins by looking at the diversity of animal sexual and mating behaviours from a system viewpoint, and follows by discussing the literature about human development, finishing with a review of the diversity of sexual and gender systems across human cultures. What emerges is a critique of the stereotypes that are endemic in ethology and evolutionary psychology, from Darwin through to Dawkin's Selfish Gene. Roughgarden confronts head on the puzzle of human homosexuality with the premise that, if a theory says that there is something wrong with so many people, it is the theory that is wrong, not the people.
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10. Ethology

  1. Lewin, R., (1998 Fourth Edition) Human Evolution: An Illustrated Introduction,
    Massachusetts: Blackwell Science. ISBN 0632043091
    The copy I have is a special edition for the Open University's course S292 "Human Evolution." New discoveries in recent years have revised the fine detail of our ideas about human beginnings, thus, by the time you read this, there may be a fifth edition. There may also be a more extended discussion of molecular biology and cladistics. Nevertheless this is a detailed and readable account of the range of scientific approaches which have allowed us to build up a picture from what are little more than scattered fragments.
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Miscellaneous

  1. Gould, S.J., (1996) The Mismeasure of Man
    W.W. Norton; ISBN: 0393314251
    Well known for his ability to make the most esoteric scientific ideas accessible to the general reader, Gould analyses psychometric tests which rank people in terms of supposed gifts, such as intelligence, examines their history, and exposes the flaws inherent in the mathematics.
  2. Hrdy, S. B., (1981) The Woman That Never Evolved
    London: Harvard University Press ISBN 0674955412
    This is Hrdy's challenge to the androcentrism of sociobiogy. More importantly, rather than picking particular species and drawing often rather forced comparisons with human behaviour, which was the fashion of the the time (and to some extent still is), she surveys the whole range of primates and, importantly, the different environments they occupy. Another five star book.
  3. Taylor, T., (1996) The Prehistory of Sex: Four Million Years of Sexual Culture.
    London: Fourth Estate ISBN 1857025733
    This book has an unfortunate publishing history. When I suggested it to a book club, they replied that they had tried to publish it in the past, but it had been a flop. Those who expected a sex book didn't want the science, while scientists were turned off by the sex. This, to me, says something about our peculiar culture.
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Book graphic courtesy of Amazon.co.uk
Copyright Jed Bland. 25.05.98 Last amended 22.09.03, 24.11.03, 28.12.03, 11.01.04, 31.01.04, 29.02.04, 10.03.04, 26.09.10